Halloween provides the perfect opportunity to indulge your inner child. Get dressed up! Become a goblin! Look bloody and mouldy! It is the one night of the year when your make-up can be as crazy as imaginable, and where copious quantities of black, red and white paint are more than welcome. And what better way to maximise your look than with expert tips from make-up artists who know exactly what to do to create gruesome brilliance?

1. Get ready!

Carly Hobbs, celebrity make-up artist and hairstylist, recommends that you prep your face before you start.“Do a full concealer and foundation base and then add your blood, guts and special effects,” says Carly. “This means that your look will be properly scary and it will also be properly professional.”

Athena Demetriou, freelance makeup artist, suggests applying a layer of almost white foundation to the entire face to create that corpse look: “I blend my usual foundation with white foundation to get a very pale shade that looks realistically deathly. I recommend cleansing the face 30 minutes prior to applying make-up and using a lightweight moisturiser so that the skin doesn’t become greasy as this will affect the latex setting properly.”

2. Go gruesome

Athena reveals the perfect way to create a "torn mouth" look, using liquid latex, cotton wool, fake blood, a professional bruise wheel, a spatula and a tissue. “Use your bruise wheel to build up bruises where you want them and apply with either your fingers or a sponge.”

Apply a thin layer of liquid latex to the corners of the lips and add a thin layer of tissue. Keep applying until you get the look you want. After the tissue and latex have dried, use your spatula to pick into the tissue to create the slits and then apply your spooky foundation blend on top so it resembles the color of your face. Daub fake blood or colours from the bruise wheel into the middle of the slits to really make them gory.

3. Remove your eye

Athena’s "torn mouth" goes perfectly with her missing eye. You’ll need all the tools from the gruesome mouth to create this effect.

“Use cotton wool to build up the colour using your bruise wheel – try and use the darkest colours as you want it to look like an empty black hole once attached to your skin,” says Athena. “Purple, dark blue and red are the best options. Ensure every piece of cotton wool is covered so no white can be seen and then apply a thin layer of liquid latex around the eye. Be very careful not to let it get too close to the eye and avoid the eyebrows.”

Then apply the liquid latex to the cotton wool, place it over the eye and add extra to stick it down. Cover the latex using the bruise colouring and add some fake blood to create a really damaged look!

4. Get bloody

“When adding fake blood to create cuts, wounds and slashes, add a layer, let it set, then add another,” says Carly. “Then add another. Leaving it to dry in between applications creates an authentic crusty appearance. You can also weave netting and smudges of gel black eyeliner to make your wound look extra manky.”

The experts both recommend investing in professional fake blood to achieve the perfect look as some of the cheaper variations don’t work as well or look as good.

5. Keep it intact

Athena suggests using a lightweight setting spray on your creations to keep them in place for the majority of the night. And use your imagination!

“Once you have played around with the looks you like you can have a lot of fun with your liquid latex and bruise wheel,” she says. “You can get some really amazing effects.”

6. Get it off

You’ve spent the night terrorising your friends and family members, but now it is time to go to bed. Carly suggests taking everything off properly the night before by peeling off any excess blood, netting and lashes, and soaking cotton pads in a delicate cleanser to clean your skin.

“I usually soak some make-up remover wipes in warm water and press them against the liquid latex and fake blood to help dissolve it,” says Athena. “It can be tricky, but patience pays off. Make sure your skin is thoroughly cleaned and moisturised!”

This article was commissioned via NewsCred's NewsRoom and written by freelance contributor Tamsin Oxford.